Springbloom Druid

There have been a couple of occasions lately where commissions kind of line up with things going on in my life. In this case, Art Director Cynthia Sheppard reached out to me to illustrate this card, which featured a pretty basic description of a Druid bringing life back into a forest ravaged by fire.

Springbloom Druid 18x24” oil over acrylic on panel  Original art available

Springbloom Druid
18x24” oil over acrylic on panel
Original art available

It just so happens that some half year or so prior to this assignment reaching me, we here in Sonoma County went through the North Bay Fires of October 2017. While we were spared here, we did spend most of a week under advisory evacuation, and during that conflagration we knew too many people who lost their homes. Out of that horrible experience came my painting “Turning Point” as a meditation on hope after loss.

Preliminary study, 8x10” acrylic and pencil on paper Original art sold

Preliminary study, 8x10” acrylic and pencil on paper
Original art sold

I asked if that had been intentional, and Cynthia responded that no, it was not but that it might have been subconscious, since I had posted about my experience on social media at the time. Given the potential for being sensitive to the topic she asked if I wanted to pass on painting this, but no this was exactly up my alley and in line with the message I had communicated in “Turning Point” just a couple of months prior.

Shrunken down to card size, the burnt out trees look almost comical in their lack of branches (compared to a fully rendered unburnt tree as in my painting “Resilience”). And yet, one of the things you learn after a devastating fire is how most of the thinnest branches of a tree simply burn away, or break and fall to the ground where all but the biggest branches are consumed by fire, leaving these anemic sticks were mighty trees once stood. The completely ashen ground that is leftover until the rains come to wash it away or turn it to mud is another striking feature. And that weird ruddy sunset color that makes up the sky while the air is still choked with smoke.

In the midst of this sits our druid, a riot of plant life emerging before him and beginning to reclaim the barren wastes. Glowing eyes and hands are a common trope of this kind of art, so I enjoyed placing the magical image of a flower in bloom on each glowing palm.

Addressing this topic of hope after ruin twice in just a few months was a good experience for me, and I’m glad to have this part of my story in a sense recorded in the game that has been a part of my story for so many years now.

As an aside, as of this writing, the first of the families who I know whose home was lost has finished rebuilding, and within a month or so from now the second family will get to move back in to their rebuilt home as well. So many yet to go, though.