Inspiring Cleric

My second piece for the Ixalan release of Magic: the Gathering is this rather simple image, yet there were a couple of ways for me to make it less-than-simple.

"Inspiring Cleric" 18x24" oil over acrylic on panel Original available

"Inspiring Cleric"
18x24" oil over acrylic on panel
Original available

For starters, as mentioned in my breakdown for Ixalan Merfolk, I usually do the heavy decision-making on which image to present to the Magic Art Director myself, giving them just a single option to thumbs-up or down. For other types of clients, multiple sketches might be required or preferable but with Magic, the overwhelming majority of the time, one is sufficient. If anything I might get a little bit of, "Make sure you focus on this bit," or, "Adjust the [thing] a bit like so, but go ahead." It's pretty rare that I'm sent back to the drawing board entirely. But sometimes, there might be cause to submit more than one image for the Art Director to choose.

The first reason is because I simply can't decide which one to choose, so rather than make that awful choice, I'll leave it up to the Art Director. The other is that while I may prefer one very slightly over another, the other has an aspect that the first doesn't which might be more important as a card or composition.

In this case, it was more the latter. The assignment was fairly simple: show one of the Conquistador-inspired Vampires presenting a sword wrapped with some fabric containing some of the pre-designed and gothic-inspired text used by their culture. The environment in this case was to be the interior of one of their galleons, though that wouldn't necessarily be obvious in a small format. However, it gave me enough to go on, and the darker interiors would play nicely with the pale fabric and skin.

"Inspiring Cleric' preliminary study 8x10" pencil and acrylic on paper Original available

"Inspiring Cleric' preliminary study
8x10" pencil and acrylic on paper
Original available

Both studies, as submitted to Art Director Dawn Murin. Digital over pencil/acrylic

Both studies, as submitted to Art Director Dawn Murin.
Digital over pencil/acrylic

Compositions like this tend to be a bit more limited in that with the pose being specified, there are reduced opportunities for what to do or show. I liked this sort of at-angle version best from my thumbnails, and worked up the study of it. However I thought the presentation-of-the-weapon aspect was not necessarily as obvious as the version that had the character presenting the viewer with the sword; additionally, by making the figure more straight-on, it was more clear that she was holding a sword. Straight forward and side portrayals tend to emphasize shapes and objects much more than at-angle views.

So, I worked up a second study and submitted them both. I wasn't going to be surprised either way, but they went with the first study, and I was off to the races.

Choosing a size for a painting is a struggle on its own. If you take a figure, say, and enlarge it many times by intervals, you start to get a sense that some of the sizes are good for painting at, and others are bad. And as the figure grows, it's strange, you'll find it's good at a number of growing sizes, then it may hit a streak of enlargements that would be less-than-ideal, and then it suddenly gets to good enlargements again. I think a lot of traditional painters would agree with this, though for any given composition we might differ on where those lines are for each of us. But in this case, I chose an 18x24" panel, for only the second time.

I mentioned back in the run down for Vizier of Remedies that my newest entries in Magic illustration were being done a bit differently. Only taking an occasional commission now, I am more intent on just enjoying them as paintings; this means that I can choose larger sizes more often, which I might've chosen before but which were painted smaller than I really wanted sometimes just because I had more commissions to get done.